Is it really Winter?

A dark rainy winter is upon us in Southwest Michigan.  Snow has been sparse and weather patterns are quite strange.  Overall, my sense is that our hardiness zone is shifting from 5 to 6, meaning possibly less fruit diversity and more things like Okra and crops that grown in Tennessee.  2012 was a pretty bad year for all kinds of fruit around here.  Paying attention to these shifting weather patterns is not easy or ever truly predictable.  

We finally made a new sign for Earthen Heart by laminating this lovely painting by Ms. Palma Jane Burdick.

Amaranth has been a new crop for us the last few years.  Getting down to clean seeds proved to be very labor intensive – though the end result is very valuable.  Both leaves and seeds are super tasty and tremendously nutrient rich.  We have been experimenting with frying and boiling the seed with the chaff and leaves all at once into a stew.  Also drying and making into a powder in breads.  This crop is so nutrient rich but is generally considered as a mere pest.  In fact it is one of the only plants that is not killed by the deadly Monsanto chemical Round Up.  Thus it is a greatly despised plant by most farmers.  But in case you were not aware, we are not most farmers.  We have at least four varieties growing and are planting more varieties.  This plant is considered a super food and sustained people for many centuries.  Another example of a neglected plant to pay attention to when we need something hyperlocal and nutrient rich.

We have begun planting rye as a cover crop and as a grass to compete in the fields.  We are trying to establish it in areas that soil is extremely sandy, pushing the seed to its limits.

Fully processed a 5 gallon bucket of rye berries that are being used in baking and for making sprouts this winter.

We are happy to have completed a south facing solar collection room.  It is a good place to grow potted plants, get seedlings going, set up a table, let the dogs hang out and collect heat in the spring and fall to filter into the house.  In summer it will need more ventilation.  Hopefully the wasps don’t like it quite as much as we do.  Also connected is a water collection gutter system that goes into a couple 50 gallon buckets for the animals and watering plants.

The barn is set to become a multi-purpose building with a wood burning stove, sleeping loft, kitchenette and an outdoor shower. 

As you can see we built a little stage on the south side of the barn for musicians and performers to share some songs and creations.  The old foundations around the barn are slated to become a greenhouse and hang out environment.  We hope to have more hands on deck to make this space become a cornerstone of the Earthen Heart experience. 
We are looking forward to the upcoming season and the bounty that is forthcoming and we are thankful for the goods that currently stock our shelves and freezer…. such as this tomato blueberry fruit leather with curry, sumac and yogurt.

Thanks to Lorena and Jocelyn and the many other visitors from Chicago to Siberia who have helped us slowly build this dream into a reality.  It is happening all around us on this lovely planet Earth that we share.  I trust we can focus on the positive act of building and nurturing something beautiful and protecting that which is sacred.  Again, I thank you all for your support, smiles and hard working hands!